10-Common- Misunderstandings-for-dog-behaviors
10-Common- Misunderstandings-for-dog-behaviors

           10 Common Misunderstandings for dog behaviors 

It seems that everyone believes that they understand dogs and dog behaviors at least well enough to get along with their own pet. They base this belief on “facts” that they may have heard from their parents, friends, and acquaintances. Unfortunately, acting on such misinformation can result in bad outcomes, a sharp deterioration in trust, and possibly increased aggressionIn this article, we replace folk tales with fact. True or false? In North America, one out of every four families lives with a dog
The simple act of making a dog work for everything he wants, such as obeying a simple command like “Sit” before being given dinner, or even being given a pat, tells him that you’re in charge.  Without an authority figure and adequate pack structure, your dog will become quite stressed. This stress is the source of many dog behavior problems. These problems come about because the dog thinks, “If no one in my pack is in charge, then someone must make the decisions, and the only one left is me.” Thus, the unwilling dog is forced into a position of leadership. He must then be ever vigilant and becomes pushy, dominant, and even aggressive.
10 Common Misunderstandings for dog behaviors 
1- Every Dog Wants to Be Leader of the Pack
The simple act of making a dog work for everything he wants, such as obeying a simple command like “Sit” before being given dinner, or even being given a pat, tells him that you’re in charge. 
Without an authority figure and adequate pack structure, your dog will become quite stressed. This stress is the source of many dog behavior problems. These problems come about because the dog thinks, “If no one in my pack is in charge, then someone must make the decisions, and the only one left is me.” Thus, the unwilling dog is forced into a position of leadership. He must then be ever vigilant and becomes pushy, dominant, and even aggressive.
Actually, the wag of a dog’s tail can signal many things, depending upon its speed and the way the tail is carried. A happy tail wag is actually a submissive gesture and one that is often paired with a lower rump, which seems to drag the hips with each swing. Translated, it says, “You have my respect, and I know you will not hurt me. "A dog gives this signal completely approachable.
10 Common Misunderstandings for dog behaviors 
2- A Wagging Tail Means a Happy and Friendly Dog
Actually, the wag of a dog’s tail can signal many things, depending upon its speed and the way the tail is carried.
A happy tail wag is actually a submissive gesture and one that is often paired with a lower rump, which seems to drag the hips
with each swing. Translated, it says, “You have my respect, and I know you will not hurt me. "A dog gives this signal completely approachable.
Dogs can learn specific words that humans speak, with the average dog capable of learning around 165 words and/or signals. In addition, dogs are very attuned to a tone of voice and instinctively pair it to an emotional state, thus people with deep voices are often given reverence, whereas doting, placating family members are often ignored.  A dog, no matter how intelligent, can’t process full grammatical sentences.
10 Common Misunderstandings for dog behaviors 
3- Dogs Understand Human Language
Dogs can learn specific words that humans speak, with the average dog capable of learning around 165 words and/or signals. In addition, dogs are very attuned to a tone of voice and instinctively pair it to an emotional state, thus people with deep voices are often given reverence, whereas doting, placating family members are often ignored. 
A dog, no matter how intelligent, can’t process full grammatical sentences.
Fearful animals are, in fact, more likely to bite than dominant  animals.  Panic drives fearful dogs to do anything to reduce the presence of a threat. Further, when you retreat from a dominant dog, he’ll stop any further threat of aggression: In essence, you did what he asked. When you retreat from a fearful dog, however, he may still rush and snap as your presence is still a potential threat. He’s afraid that you may still return to hurt him, so his emotions may well swamp any logical thinking about the situation. You should view all frightened animals as potentially aggressive.
10 Common Misunderstandings for dog behaviors 
4- A Fearful Dog Won’t Bite
Fearful animals are, in fact, more likely to bite than dominant 
animals.  Panic drives fearful dogs to do anything to reduce the presence of a threat. Further, when you retreat from a dominant dog, he’ll stop any further threat of aggression: In essence, you did what he asked. When you retreat from a fearful dog, however, he may still rush and snap as your presence is still a potential threat. He’s afraid that you may still return to hurt him, so his emotions may well swamp any logical thinking about the situation. You should view all frightened animals as potentially aggressive.
If your dog has such a trash problem and you still believe that your dog feels guilt, strew some trash on the kitchen floor yourself, let Rover see it, and then leave the house for five minutes. When you return, you’ll see your dog cringing in the same manner that you call guilt, even though he knows that he’s not responsible.
10 Common Misunderstandings for dog behaviors 
5- Dogs Know When They have Done Wrong
If your dog has such a trash problem and you still believe that your dog feels guilt, strew some trash on the kitchen floor yourself, let Rover sees it, and then leave the house for five minutes. When you return, you’ll see your dog cringing in the same manner that you call guilt, even though he knows that he’s not responsible.
Another reason dogs choose to destroy or carry objects is that they may have your scent. Objects with the strongest scent are apt to be objects that you use frequently, so you naturally believe that the dog has deliberately chosen that object to distress or annoy you. However, this behavior is driven by a longing for your com pany, not a spiteful reaction to your departure.

10 Common Misunderstandings for dog behaviors 

6- Dogs Sometimes Behave Out of Spite
Another reason dogs choose to destroy or carry objects is that
they may have your scent. Objects with the strongest scent are apt to object that you use frequently, 
so you naturally believe that the dog has deliberately chosen that object to distress or annoy you. 
However, this behavior is driven by a longing for your
a company, not a spiteful reaction to your departure.
dogs naturally chase any animal that runs from them — including cats.  Sighthounds and terriers are the breeds most likely to chase cats. Unlike other wild prey, however, when trapped, a cat will turn and fight. Such a confrontation is noisy and dangerous for both animals, and if you’ve experienced such an event, you’d certainly remember it. However, if you look at the statistics, you’ll note 56 percent of dog owners also own cats, and they happily coexist, meaning that harmony between the species is within your reach
10 Common Misunderstandings for dog behaviors 
7-Dogs Hate Cats
dogs naturally chase any animal that runs from them —including cats. Sighthounds and terriers are the breeds
most likely to chase cats.
Unlike other wild prey, however, when trapped, a cat will turn and fight. Such a confrontation is noisy and dangerous for both animals, and if you’ve experienced such an event, you’d certainly remember it.
however, when trapped, a cat will turn and fight. Such a confrontation is noisy and dangerous for both animals, and if you’ve experienced such an event, you’d certainly remember it. However, if you look at the statistics, you’ll note 56 percent of dog owners also own cats, and they happily coexist, meaning that harmony between the species is within your reach.
10 Common Misunderstandings for dog behaviors 
 However, if you look at the statistics, you’ll note 56 percent of dog owners also own cats, and they happily coexist, meaning that harmony between the species is within your reach.
Teach your children how to interact with dogs properly. Encourage your children to reach out their hands to allow a dog to sniff it. If the dog turns away, your children should, too. If the dog sniffs their hand calmly, show your children the appropriate way to stroke and pet them, but enforce absolutely no hugs!
10 Common Misunderstandings for dog behaviors 
8-Dogs Like It When You Hug Them
Teach your children how to interact with dogs properly. Encourage your children to reach out their hands to allow a dog to sniff it. If the dog turns away, your children should, too. If the dog sniffs their hand calmly, show your children the appropriate way to stroke and pet them, but enforce absolutely no hugs.
Avoid working with your dog when you’re stressed. Use this time to relax or play games that may lighten your mood before you train or do other work with your pet.
10 Common Misunderstandings for dog behaviors 
9- Your Stress Has No Effect on Your Dog
Avoid working with your dog when you’re stressed. Use this time to relax or play games that may lighten your mood before you train or do other work with your pet.
the next time your dog is licking your face, ask yourself whether he’s hungry. Perhaps he’s simply asking for something to eat. Of course, humans, being easily flattered, often reward what they perceive as loving attention with a snack. And so it comes full circle.
10 Common Misunderstandings for dog behaviors 
10- Dogs’ Licks Are Kisses
the next time your dog is licking your face, ask yourself whetherhe’s hungry. Perhaps he’s simply asking for something to eat. Of course, humans, being easily flattered, often reward what they perceive as loving attention with a snack. And so it comes full circle.