6 Effective Tricks For Feeding Your Baby

6 Effective Tricks For Feeding Your Baby

6 Effective Tricks For Feeding Your Baby

1-Take a time-out and turn off the TV. Mealtimes are a great time for you
and your child to spend quality time together. Limit distractions as much
as possible. This will help your child learn to focus on the food, not get
sidelined by too much noise or visual stimulation, and not get used to
eating in front of the TV, which can lead to mindless overeating.
 Mealtimes are a great time for you  and your child to spend quality time together. Limit distractions as much  as possible. This will help your child learn to focus on the food
6 Effective Tricks For Feeding Your Baby

2-Sit your baby in a high chair near or at the dinner table. Teaching your
child to eat at the table as opposed to on the sofa or in the bedroom is a
great way not only to keep your house neat but to instill a good habit
that can last a lifetime.
Teaching your  child to eat at the table as opposed to on the sofa or in the bedroom is a  great way not only to keep your house neat but to instill a good habit  that can last a lifetime.
6 Effective Tricks For Feeding Your Baby

3-Offer small portions of a variety of nutritious foods, and let your child
decide whether or how much to eat. It’s not unusual for infants’
appetites to fluctuate, so respect them and resist the urge to force
them to eat, especially when they start to push food away or spit it out.
let your child  decide whether or how much to eat. It’s not unusual for infants’  appetites to fluctuate, so respect them and resist the urge to force  them to eat, especially when they start to push food away or spit it out.
6 Effective Tricks For Feeding Your Baby

4-Offer new foods one at a time every two to four days. That can help you
identify any food your child may be sensitive to. If you suspect your
child has a reaction—such as a rash or a bellyache—in response to a
particular food, be sure to check in with your pediatrician. You can offer
mixed foods only after you have determined your child is not allergic to
the individual ingredients.
That can help you  identify any food your child may be sensitive to. If you suspect your  child has a reaction—such as a rash or a bellyache—in response to a  particular food, be sure to check in with your pediatrician.
6 Effective Tricks For Feeding Your Baby

5-Offer fruit instead of juice. Although small amounts of 100% fruit juices
(such as orange juice, cranberry juice, white grape juice, and apple
juice) can provide healthful nutrients that infants and toddlers need,
encourage fruit instead of juice, especially during the first year in life,
to provide fiber and other key nutrients and help children develop a
taste for a wide range of fruits. If after age one your child resists fruit,
can provide healthful nutrients that infants and toddlers need,  encourage fruit instead of juice, especially during the first year in life,  to provide fiber and other key nutrients and help children develop a  taste for a wide range of fruits.
6 Effective Tricks For Feeding Your Baby

up to 4 ounces of 100% fruit juice a day can provide some nutrients.
6-Stay the course. Always keep in mind that babies and young children
can be very picky; if they refuse to eat a particular food, they may
decide to try it after several exposures, even as many as ten or fifteen.
Stay the course and if child still refuses offer another food in the same category
6 Effective Tricks For Feeding Your Baby

If after a week or two your child still refuses to try something, offer
another food in the same category.
If you offer children a variety of healthful foods (whole-grain bread
and cereals, fruits, and vegetables), they are much more likely to choose
these foods as they get older when they’re more in control of what they
eat. 


Don't Forget My Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner
6 Effective Tricks For Feeding Your Baby
Following is a sample menu for a typical child between the ages of
one and two:
Sample Menu for a One- to Two-Year-Old Child
A typical child between the ages of one and two requires approximately 900 calories and about 30 to 40 percent of their calories from
fat. Here’s what 900 calories can look like on a typical day, based on
the meal pattern described in chapter 10:
Breakfast
1⁄2 cup oatmeal (1 grain)
1⁄2 cup sliced strawberries (1⁄2 cup fruit)
1 cup whole milk (1 cup milk/yogurt/cheese)
Lunch
11⁄2 ounces grilled chicken, cut in small pieces (11⁄2 ounce meat/beans)
1⁄4 cup mashed sweet potato (1⁄4 cup vegetables)
1⁄2 cup whole milk (1⁄2 cup milk/yogurt/cheese)
Dinner
1⁄2 cup macaroni (1 grain)
1 ounce/slice cheese (70 extra calories)
1⁄2 cup peas and carrots (1⁄2 cup vegetables)
1 teaspoon trans fat–free margarine (1 oil)
Snacks/Desserts (in between meals)
2 vanilla wafers (32 extra calories)
1⁄2 cup natural applesauce (1⁄2 cup fruit)
Young Children and Preteens
More and more kids are becoming overweight, with no signs of a slow￾down. In just the last six years, the number of children between the
ages of two and five at risk of overweight or overweight have increased
from 22 percent to 26 percent; the number of six- to eleven-year-olds
considered at risk or overweight has increased from about 30 percent
to 37 percent.